Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS) and Social Security Benefits

I was only 14 years old when my mother was diagnosed with ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. At the time of her diagnosis she was so full of life that myself, my father, as well as my 11 living brothers and sisters were in denial that life would change forever.

Life did change. It changed for her and us; and it changed very quickly. I remember being on “mom duty”. Mom duty meant we were in charge of helping her with her every want and need. It meant moving her legs for her because she couldn’t. It meant carrying her around the house. It meant being there for her when she called. It meant helping her be comfortable. After countless days of “mom duty”, I grew to love her in a way that my little 14 year old mind could never imagine. For someone like my mother who has been diagnosed with ALS, life changes very dramatically and very quickly.

The symptoms of ALS include muscle weakness and twitching that begins, usually in the arms and legs then spreads to other parts of the body. There is no cure for ALS, but there are medications that can help with the symptoms. There are also many organizations that can help those who suffer from ALS such as the ALS Association. For residents of Texas, the ALS has a Texas Chapter. Residents of Sn Antonio and surrounding areas can contact and meet with the San Antonio ALS group. You can find information on their website about how to contact them to receive help and support.

Though my mother suffered greatly, she was not able to get Social Security Benefits. These benefits, however, are available for many who suffer from Lou Gehrig's Disease from the very first diagnosis. You must be over the age of 18, meet the income limits as well as be able to prove that you have been diagnosed with ALS. Read what medical evidence you need to prove the diagnosis of ALS.

ALS is a medical condition that is a part of the “compassionate service” program. This basically means that the case can be marked as a “critical case” and will be expedited. This means that the application and approval process can be sped up. Talk with your attorney to find out how to begin this process of Expedited Approvals.

Lou Gehrig’s Disease is a difficult disability to live with. Luckily, for those of you who may qualify for Social Security Disability, there is help.

Be the first to comment!
Post a Comment